Senators like the problem more than the solution

Photo by The New York Public Library on Unsplash

When President Biden signed the “Executive Order on the Revision of Civil Immigration Enforcement Policies and Priorities” on January 20th, he may have never anticipated that he is signing the biggest political football of his presidency.

Though the immigration issue has slowly faded to the backburners of our collective memory, the migrant crisis will forever remain a touchy topic for the Democrats. Of course, the Republicans and the Democrats prefer the status quo, but the solution has always remained within the borders of Washington, D.C.

For the Republicans:

  • Immigration is a big…

But there will be only one winner

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Joseph Robinette Biden Jr, a member of the Democratic Party and the 46th President of the United States, is a player. Not the kind we normally associate with the term — player, but more in the lines of a chess player who simulates subsequent moves in his head and then moves his pieces across the board.

The man who was called a mental retard by Donald Trump and fondly known as mentally compromised in right-wing circles has tricked the Washington political game into appointing him as the winner. …


They find it difficult to work with a religious President

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For hours, the Catholic bishops of the United States who gathered virtually at the USCCB headquarters in Washington, D.C., this week discussed a brazenly political move that will allow them to set sail in the political waters during the 2022 midterms.

The Roman Catholic bishops of the United States advanced a vote to deny political leaders communion when their political views diverge from the church. …


Obama’s signature achievement survives third Supreme Court challenge

President Obama Signs Health Insurance Legislation Into Law

“If I win the presidency, my judicial appointments will do the right thing unlike Bush’s appointee John Roberts on ObamaCare,” Donald Trump tweeted in 2015. More than seventy GOP attempts to repeal, and three Supreme Court challenges later, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has emerged stronger than it ever was.

On a 7–2 vote, two out of the three justices appointed by Donald Trump sided with the majority to dismiss the latest challenge to ACA.

The case: On behalf of 17 states and two individuals, the state of Texas argued that the…


Who Will Win?

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When Trump campaigned for Republican Senate candidates Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue on January 4th, instead of talking about the candidates, he ranted and raved for more than an hour, litigating his election loss to a vociferous crowd in Georgia.

An aerial view may lull someone into thinking that Georgia is turning into a deep blue state, as it went from Democrat Stacey Abrams losing a statewide race by 54k votes against GOP’s Brian Kemp in 2018 to Biden winning the Presidential election by 11k votes to Raphael Warnock winning the Senate seat in Georgia by 93k


Global Confidence in America Rebounds from a Historic Low

Photo by VÍctor Daniel Giraldo on Unsplash

What’s with Biden and 70?

President Biden wants to administer at least one dose of vaccine to 70% of American adults by July 4th. “Nearly 70% of Americans support President Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief plan”. A recent survey conducted by Pew Research Center in 12 nations found 75% “express confidence in Biden, compared with 17% for Trump last year”.


And the fall of hardworking lawmakers

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A strong political system will stifle the growth of lazy politicians, purge bad-faith actors and attract high-profile candidates. Instead, the US political system aided and abetted by the media continues to do the exact opposite. It rewards theatrics, attracts bad-faith actors, and repels high-profile individuals from taking the political plunge.

Nothing explains this absurdity better than the rise of the Democratic quad, the Republican squad, and the ever-rising prominence of people like Steven Bannon and Stephen Miller. It’s a dangerous cocktail that will kill the democracy someday.

Money and a national spotlight have already…


The nominee effect

Photo by LiveScience

Not just winning candidates, even presidential nominees who lost the general election profoundly impact their party's direction. But when the party’s nominee wins the White House, he becomes the de-facto leader of the party and the one with superpowers to pull the party in the direction he chooses.

It is not an unusual phenomenon, but we still underestimate the nominee's effect on the party. Thanks to Donald Trump and Mitch McConnell, the Republican party has made a hard right turn, and their primaries have already turned into a right-wing selection camp. …


It is not a long story

Photo by https://twitter.com/Sen_JoeManchin/

West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin has crashed the party. As a result, the fantasy that Democrats will pass the voting rights bill to undo the damage Republican legislatures around the country delivered to voting access is over.

Joe Manchin revealed his cards when he wrote, “I have always said, If I can’t go home and explain it, I can’t vote for it. And I cannot explain strictly partisan election reform or blowing up the Senate rules to expedite one party’s agenda.”

There you go again. The same old bi-partisanship wine that’s served to intoxicate…


Jeff Bezos paid 0.98%, Michael Bloomberg paid 1.3%, and Elon Musk paid 3.27% in income taxes as a share of wealth.

Screenshot from ProPublica.org

The 25 wealthiest Americans paid $13.6 billion in federal income taxes over a five-year period in which their collective wealth expanded by $401 billion. That’s the equivalent of someone who makes $68,903 annually paying a federal income tax of $2,336, way less than the realistic federal tax bill that will be closer to $13k.

Early Warning: This sophisticated tax reduction act is performed by highly trained, highly paid tacticians with the full blessings of US politicians at the highest…

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