Ukraine’s Worst Case Scenario is a Doomsday Call for Putin’s Regime

Not immediate and complete collapse, but steady and gravitational

Shankar Narayan

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“What’s Ukraine’s victory like?” one reader wondered. I replied by pointing to President Biden’s words at the UN General Assembly in September this year: “If we let Ukraine get divided, can any nation’s independence be safe? I’d say no. We’ve got to confront this blatant aggression now and discourage potential aggressors in the future.” This implies that Russian troops withdraw from Ukraine, and Ukraine, reverts to its 1991 borders, which were the same boundaries it had after the dissolution of the Soviet Union into multiple independent states.

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There are various types of dictatorships worldwide, and Russia stands out as a unique one. With a market boasting 140 million people and a significant role as one of the world’s largest oil and gas producers, Russia possesses a product that the global economy heavily relies upon. As a member of a powerful cartel, they spare no effort to ensure their coffers remain full.

This substantial market, combined with a steady stream of revenue from oil and gas, likely fueled Putin’s belief that he had the power to reshape the world in a Russian image. He plundered the state to keep himself and his cronies rich and powerful, while regularly triggering in wars to keep his country men fearful and submissive.

Every time Russia ventured beyond its borders, the world responded with such astonishment that it often bent over backward to appease Putin. This pattern was evident in instances like Russia’s military interventions in Georgia in 2008 and Ukraine in 2014, which highlighted the world’s propensity to accommodate Russian actions.

The Syrian conflict was largely overlooked, and this has played a role in the current challenges facing Israel. There seemed to be no limit to how far they would go to coax Russian forces back within their own…

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Shankar Narayan

He didn't care what he had or what he had left, he cared only about what he must do.